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George Clinton Would Rather We Rename Washington D.C. To “Chocolate City”

The album uses the name “Chocolate City,” which had been used to describe Washington, D.C. where blacks had been becoming a majority through migration (as explained in the cover notes included with one recent CD release of the album). George Clinton Would Rather We Rename Washington D.C. To “Chocolate City”

George Clinton Would Rather Have "Chocolate City" As Compared To Washington D.C.

The name or term had been used by Washington’s black AM radio stations WOL-AM and WOOK-AM since the early 1970s to refer to the city. Bobby “The Mighty Burner” Bennett, a DJ on WOL, told the Washington Post in 1998 “Chocolate City for me was the expression of D.C.’s classy funk and confident blackness.”

George Clinton used the concept in the title track using the black domination of the inner city populations as a positive message in contrast to concern over White flight. The lyrics of the song refer to several such “chocolate cities” but focuses on D.C.:

“There’s a lot of chocolate cities around/We got Newark, we got Gary/Someone told me we got L.A./ And we’re working on Atlanta / But you’re the capital C.C.”

Clinton’s lyrics referred to Chocolate City as “my piece of the rock” as opposed to the “40 acres and a mule” that slaves were promised after the Civil War. He contrasted Chocolate City with the “vanilla suburbs” of the city, a term first used on the track.

George Clinton Would Rather Have "Chocolate City" As Compared To Washington D.C.

How Did Washington, D.C., Get Its Name?

Before Washington, D.C., became America’s capital in 1800, the Congress met in a number of different locations, including Baltimore, Trenton and New York City. After years of debate by the new nation’s leaders about the selection of a permanent seat of government, Congress passed the Residence Act in July 1790, which declared that the capital would be situated somewhere along the Potomac River and granted President George Washington the power to choose the final site.

The president also was given the authority to appoint three commissioners to oversee the federal city’s development, and a deadline of December 1800 was established for the completion of a legislative hall for Congress and residence for the chief executive.

George Clinton Would Rather Have "Chocolate City" As Compared To Washington D.C.

In January 1791, George Washington announced his choice for the federal district: 100 square miles of land ceded by Maryland and Virginia (in 1846, the Virginia land was returned to the state, shrinking the district by a third). In September 1791, the commissioners named the federal city in honor of Washington and dubbed the district in which it was located the Territory of Columbia.

The name Columbia, derived from explorer Christopher Columbus, was used during the American Revolution era as a patriotic reference for the United States (In 1871, the Territory of Columbia officially was renamed District of Columbia.)

D.C. Mayor Bowser Has ‘Black Lives Matter’ Painted On Street Leading To White House

Meanwhile, in the spring of 1791, the president hired French-born architect and engineer Pierre Charles L’Enfant to lay out the capital city. L’Enfant, who served in the Continental Army during the Revolutionary War, created a design that featured wide avenues and open spaces; however, he clashed with George Washington’s commissioners (Benjamin Banniker: African American) as well as local landowners and was forced to resign from the project after less than a year. L’Enfant’s design was revised by later planners.


Congress met in Washington for the first time in November 1800 (the man for whom the city was named had died in December of the previous year), and in February 1801 the District of Columbia, which at the time also included the cities of Alexandria and Georgetown, was placed under the control of Congress.

D.C. Mayor Bowser Has ‘Black Lives Matter’ Painted On Street Leading To White House

Today, America’s capital city has more than 650,000 residents, and they’re represented by a non-voting delegate in the U.S. House of Representatives. The 23rd Amendment gave citizens of D.C. the right to vote for president, starting in 1964, and since 1974 Washingtonians have elected their own mayor and city council.

 

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