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Advertising Company Will Use Its Billboards To Track Passing Cellphones

Clear Channel Outdoor — one of the largest outdoor advertising companies in the U.S. — is starting a new program called Radar that will use billboards to map real-world habits and behaviors from nearby consumers. Advertising Company Will Use Its Billboards To Track Passing Cellphones

The technology is sure to help advertisers better target their ads. But privacy advocates argue that it’s, well, a little creepy.

 

This is how Clear Channel Outdoor describes how the program works, in a video on its website:

“Using anonymous aggregated data from consumer cellular and mobile devices, RADAR measures consumer’s real-world travel patterns and behaviors as they move through their day, analyzing data on direction of travel, billboard viewability, and visits to specific destinations. This movement is then mapped against Clear Channel’s displays, allowing advertisers to plan and buy Out-Of-Home to reach specific behavioral audience segments.”

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Clear Channel’s Senior Vice President of Research and Insights Andy Stevens says “it’s like mobile advertising, using the same consumer behavior, but using it for [Out-Of-Home ads like billboards.]” In an interview with Media Village, he says he sees it as a way of translating digital insights to this “out of home” space.

But in an email to NPR, Clear Channel press spokesman Jason King drew a distinction between the one-to-one approach of online digital ad targeting and this strategy, which he described as “one-to-many.” He explains:

“We have no technical capability to determine the average age and gender of who sees our billboards, but the data providers can inform us by sharing, for example, that I-95 in Florida has a high percentage of families traveling to Disney World that pass many of our billboards.”

The company, which owns tens of thousands of billboards in the U.S., “will offer Radar in its top 11 markets, including Los Angeles and New York, starting on Monday, with plans to make it available across the country later this year,” The New York Times reported. Here’s more from the Times:

“Clear Channel and its partners — AT&T Data Patterns, a unit of AT&T that collects location data from its subscribers; PlaceIQ, which uses location data collected from other apps to help determine consumer behavior; and Placed, which pays consumers for the right to track their movements and is able to link exposure to ads to in-store visits — all insist that they protect the privacy of consumers. All data is anonymous and aggregated, they say, meaning individual consumers cannot be identified.”

King, the press spokesman, tells NPR that the personal consumer information will remain with the data providers, while Clear Channel will only be able to access the aggregated data.

And Stevens argues that consumers can opt out, in the interview with Media Village. He makes a distinction between the Clear Channel program and the advertising in this scene from the dystopian thriller “Minority Report.”

Here, Tom Cruise’s character walks through a shopping area as advertisements address him by name. “John Anderton! You could use a Guinness right now,” says one affable billboard. “Get away, John Anderton. Forget your troubles,” intones another billboard showing a beach scene. Here’s what Stevens thinks of this style of advertising:

“I’m not sure it’s a great user experience and it is a little creepy, to be honest. With a mass-medium like Out-Of-Home, a better use is to target general patterns of consumer groups, not the individual.”

But regardless of whether the billboards will address us personally, the new initiative is raising concerns from privacy advocates like Jeffrey Chester, executive director of the Center for Digital Democracy. “It is incredibly creepy, and it’s the most recent intrusion into our privacy,” he told The Times. “People have no idea that they’re being tracked and targeted.”

How To Block the Ultrasonic Signals You Didn’t Know Were Tracking You

An emerging tracking technique uses inaudible sounds to communicate with apps on your phone and track you. Here’s how to stop it.

Dystopian corporate surveillance threats today come at us from all directions. Companies offer “always-on” devices that listen for our voice commands, and marketers follow us around the web to create personalized user profiles so they can (maybe) show us ads we’ll actually click.

Now marketers have been experimenting with combining those web-based and audio approaches to track consumers in another disturbingly science fictional way: with audio signals your phone can hear, but you can’t. And though you probably have no idea that dog whistle marketing is going on, researchers are already offering ways to protect yourself.

The technology, called ultrasonic cross-device tracking, embeds high-frequency tones that are inaudible to humans in advertisements, web pages, and even physical locations like retail stores. These ultrasound “beacons” emit their audio sequences with speakers, and almost any device microphone—like those accessed by an app on a smartphone or tablet—can detect the signal and start to put together a picture of what ads you’ve seen, what sites you’ve perused, and even where you’ve been.

Now that you’re sufficiently concerned, the good news is that at the Black Hat Europe security conference on Thursday, a group based at University of California, Santa Barbara will present an Android patch and a Chrome extension that give consumers more control over the transmission and receipt of ultrasonic pitches on their devices.

Beyond the abstract creep factor of ultrasonic tracking, the larger worry about the technology is that it requires giving an app the ability to listen to everything around you, says Vasilios Mavroudis, a privacy and security researcher at University College London who worked on the research being presented at Black Hat.

“The bad thing is that if you’re a company that wants to provide ultrasound tracking there is no other way to do it currently, you have to use the microphone,” says Mavroudis. “So you will be what we call ‘over-privileged,’ because you don’t need access to audible sounds but you have to get them.”

This type of tracking, which has been offered in some form by companies like Silverpush and Shopkick, has hardly exploded in adoption. But it’s persisted as more third party companies develop ultrasonic tools for a range of uses, like data transmission without Wi-Fi or other connectivity. The more the technology evolves, the easier it is to use in marketing.

As a result, the researchers say that their goal is to help protect users from inadvertently leaking their personal information.

“There are certain serious security shortcomings that need to be addressed before the technology becomes more widely used,” says Mavroudis. “And there is a lack of transparency. Users are basically clueless about what’s going on.”

Currently, when Android or iOS do require apps to request permission to use a phone’s microphone. But most users likely aren’t aware that by granting that permission, apps that use ultrasonic tracking could access their microphone—and everything it’s picking up, not just ultrasonic frequencies—all the time, even while they’re running in the background.

The researchers’ patch adjusts Android’s permission system so that apps have to make it clear that they’re asking for permission to receive inaudible inputs. It also allows users to choose to block anything the microphone picks up on the ultrasound spectrum. The patch isn’t an official Google release, but represents the researchers’ recommendations for a step mobile operating systems can take to offer more transparency.

To block the other end of those high-pitched audio communications, the group’s Chrome extension preemptively screens websites’ audio components as they load to keep the ones that emit ultrasounds from executing, thus blocking pages from emitting them. There are a few old services that the extension can’t screen, like Flash, but overall the extension works much like an ad-blocker for ultrasonic tracking. The researchers plan to post their patch and their extension available for download later this month.

Ultrasonic tracking has been evolving for the last couple of years, and it is relatively easy to deploy since it relies on basic speakers and microphones instead of specialized equipment. But from the start, the technology has encountered pushback about its privacy and security limitations. Currently there are no industry standards for legitimizing beacons or allowing them to interoperate the way there are with a protocol like Bluetooth.

And ultrasonic tracking transmissions are difficult to secure because they need to happen quickly for the technology to work.

Ideally the beacons would authenticate with the receiving apps each time they interact to reduce the possibility that a hacker could create phony beacons by manipulating the tones before sending them. But the beacons need to complete their transmissions in the time it takes someone to briefly check a website or pass a store, and it’s difficult to fit an authentication process into those few seconds.

The researchers say they’ve already observed one type of real-world attack in which hackers replay a beacon over and over to skew analytics data or alter the reported behavior of a user. The team also developed other types of theoretical attacks that take advantage of the lack of encryption and authentication on beacons.

The Federal Trade Commission evaluated ultrasonic tracking technology at the end of 2015, and the privacy-focused non-profit Center for Democracy and Technology wrote to the agency at the time that “the best solution is increased transparency and a robust and meaningful opt-out system.

If cross-device tracking companies cannot give users these types of notice and control, they should not engage in cross-device tracking.” By March the FTC had drafted a warning letter to developers about a certain brand of audio beacon that could potentially track all of a users’ television viewing without their knowledge. That company, called Silverpush, has since ceased working on ultrasonic tracking in the United States, though the firm said at the time that its decision to drop the tech wasn’t related to the FTC probe.

More recently, two lawsuits filed this fall—each about the Android app of an NBA team—allege that the apps activated user microphones improperly to listen for beacons, capturing lots of other audio in the process without user knowledge. Two defendants in those lawsuits, YinzCam and Signal360, both told WIRED that they aren’t beacon developers themselves and don’t collect or store any audio in the spectrum that’s audible to humans.

But the researchers presenting at Black Hat argue that controversy over just how much audio ultrasonic tracking tools collect is all the more reason to create industry standards, so that consumers don’t need to rely on companies to make privacy-minded choices independently. “I don’t believe that companies are malicious, but currently the way this whole thing is implemented seems very shady to users,” says Mavroudis.

Once there are standards in place, the researchers propose that mobile operating systems like Android and iOS could provide application program interfaces that restrict microphone access so ultrasonic tracking apps can only receive relevant data, instead of everything the microphone is picking up. “Then we get rid of this overprivileged problem where apps need to have access to the microphone, because they will just need to have access to this API,” Mavroudis says.

For anyone who’s not waiting for companies to rein in what kinds of audio they collect to track us, however, the UCSB and UCL researchers software offers a temporary fix. And that may be more appealing than the notion of your phone talking to advertisers behind your back—or beyond your audible spectrum.

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